Descriptive Bibliography of The Jungle Book

Descriptive Bibliography of

The Jungle Book, Rudyard Kipling (1894)

I decided to do a descriptive bibliography of the 1894 version of Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book after chancing upon it in the list of Strozier Library’s Special Collections. I originally wanted to do something from the 17th century, but I didn’t want to do a bible or religious text, so that severely limited my choices, and after getting frustrated with those, I conducted a search of any books filed under ‘Folk’ published before 1900. I saw The Jungle Book, and I remembered that I enjoyed those stories when I was a child. The copy I examined had a nice ornamented cloth cover and beautiful illustrations, so I decided it would be interesting to work with this copy. I’ve also never examined any modern texts in my studies here at FSU, so I thought this would be a nice change of pace and an opportunity to learn about some more modern printing conventions.

My description of this copy is rather basic, mostly following Fredson Bowers’s suggestions for describing modern texts, and I followed the idea of the “ideal copy.” I kept the “half-title” pages in the Contents section of my description rather than in the Title-Page section because of their simplicity. I also wrote the whole of the epigraphs that occur before each chapter. These epigraphs are not in the actual chapter and I am not sure that they occur in other impressions of this book or if they are altered in some way, so I thought it best to include them in full. In the Contents section, I followed Bowers’s examples and organized my descriptions by page number rather than by gathering because for the most part the signing and pagination was very consistent, and it would have been much more difficult to locate pages and illustrations by their gathering because the gatherings are so tightly bound and glued in, making it sometimes difficult to see where one gathering ended and another began. However, the signing of the gatherings was in keeping with the physical state of the book, and the pagination was consistent, so it made sense to simply use the page numbers.

I kept the illustrations in a separate section from the Contents for a few reasons. One, I did not want to clutter up the Contents section with descriptions of illustrations and their placement. Second, this makes it much easier to locate illustrations if one is only concerned with them, and not as much concerned with the text. All illustrations that are described as “full page” occur on recto sides of leafs and the verso side is always blank, withe the exception of the very first full-page illustration, which occurs on the verso side and is followed by the main title page. If the illustration occurs on the same page as text, the orientation of the illustration with the text is noted in the description of the illustration. I did all this because since I was only able to examine this one copy, I wanted to be as specific as possible in case there are variations in the way the illustrations are printed in the different impressions of this book.

This was a rather interesting book to do a bibliographic description of because it was obviously constructed to be a high-quality, attractive copy. It is obvious that much effort was put into the aesthetic quality of the presentation, due to the decorated pages (gilded on top, fake beveling on the foredge), the high number of illustrations, and the decorated binding. It seems like this copy was meant to be something of a show-piece, and that seems rather unique in an era where books were starting to be made cheaper and in higher quantities for wide distribution.

Title-Page Transcriptions:

Main Title Page: THE | JUNGLE BOOK | BY | RUDYARD KIPLING | [Ornament] | NEW YORK | THE CENTURY CO. | 1894

RT] ‘THE JUNGLE BOOK’ on all verso sides of leafs where text occurs except in the case of title or half-title pages and front matter; on recto side, title corresponding to chapter wherever text occurs except in the case of title or half-title pages and front matter.

Format Collation, Signing, and Pagination:

8(7 1/2 x 5″): [unsigned, 08] 18 28 – 58 69 78 – 188 1910, $1-19 signed, 171 leaves. pp. [i-viii], ix, [x], xi-xiii, [xiv-xvi], 1-4, [5-6], 7-10, [11-12], 13-16, [17-18], 19-22, [23-24], 25-43, [44-46], 47-89, [90-92], 93-98, [99-100], 101-104, [105-106], 107-120, [121-122], 123-128, [129-130], 131-133, [134-136], 137-171, [172-174], 175-182, [183-184], 185-186, [187-188], 189-200, [201-202], 203-213, [214-216], 217-218, [219-220], 221-222, [223-224], 225-228, [229-230], 231-234, [235-236], 237-250, [251-252] 253-258, [259-260], 261-262, [263-264], 265-266, [267-268], 269-274, [275-276], 277-278, [279-280], 281-296, [297-298], 299-303, [304]

Contents:

p. [i-ii] blank; p. iii half-title centered ‘THE JUNGLE BOOK’; p.[iv-v] blank; p. [vii] main title; p. [viii] Copyright 1893, 1894, by | RUDYARD KIPLING | Copyright, 1984, by | HARPER and BROTHERS | Copyright 1893, 1894, by | THE CENTURY CO.| THE DE VINNE PRESS; p. ix. TABLE OF CONTENTS; p. [x] blank; p. xi ‘LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS’; p. [xiv] blank; p. [xv] half-title ‘THE JUNGLE BOOK’; p. [xvi] epigraph, ‘Now Rann, the Kite, brings home the night | That Mang, the Bat, sets free — | The herds are shut in byre and hut, | For loosed till dawn are we. | This is the hour of pride and power, | Talon and tush and claw. | Oh, hear the call ! — Good hunting all | That keep the Jungle Law ! | Night-Song in the Jungle.’; p. 42 ‘HUNTING-SONG OF THE SEEONEE PACK’ [under running title ‘MOWGLI’S BROTHERS’; p. [44] blank; p. [45] half-title ‘KAA’S HUNTING’; p. 46 epigraph, ‘His spots are the joy of the Leopard: his horns are the Buffalo’s | pride — | Be clean, for the strength of the hunter is known by the gloss | of his hide. | If ye find that the Bullock can toss you, or the heavy-browed | Sambhur can gore; | You need not stop work to inform us: we knew it ten seasons before. | Oppress not the cubs of the stranger, but hail them as Sister | and Brother, | For though they are little and fubsy, it may be the Bear is | their mother. | “There is non like to me!” says the Cub in the pride of his | earliest kill; | But the Jungle is large and the Cub he is small. Let him | think and be still. | [Right-aligned] Maxims of Baloo; p. 47 ‘KAA’S HUNTING’; p.89 ‘ROAD-SONG OF THE BANDAR-LOG’. [Under running title ‘KAA’S HUNTING’]; p. [90] blank; p. [91] half-title ‘”TIGER! TIGER!”‘; p. 92 epigraph, ‘What of the hunting, hunter bold? | Brother, the watch was long and cold. | What of the quarry ye went to kill? | Brother, he crops in the jungle still. | Where is the power that made your pride? | Brother, it ebbs from my flank and side. | Where is the haste that ye hurry by? | Brother, I go to my lair — to die.‘; p. 93 ‘”TIGER! TIGER!’; p. [130] blank; p. 131 MOWGLI’S SONG’. [under running title ‘”TIGER! TIGER!”‘]; p. [134] blank; p. [135] half-title ‘THE WHITE SEAL’; p. [136] epigraph, ‘Oh! hush thee, my baby, the night is behind us, | And black are the waters that sparkled so green. | The moon, o’er the combers, looks downward to find us | At rest in the hollows that rustle between. | Where billow meets billow, there soft by thy pillow; | Ah, weary wee flipperling, curl at thy ease! | The storm shall not wake thee, nor shark overtake thee, | Asleep in the arms of the slow-swinging seas. | [right-aligned] Seal Lullaby’; p. 137 ‘THE WHITE SEAL’; p. 170 ‘LUKANNON’ [under running title ‘THE WHITE SEAL’]; p. [172] blank; p. [173] half-title ‘”RIKKI-TIKKI-TAVI”‘; p. [174] epigraph, ‘At the hole where he went in | Red-Eye called to Wrinkle-Skin. | Hear what little Red-Eye saith: | “Nag, come up and dance with death!” | Eye to eye and head to head, | (Keep the measure, Nag.) | This shall end when one is dead; | (At thy pleasure, Nag.) | Turn for turn and twist for twist — | (Run and hide thee, Nag.) | Hah! The hooded Death has missed! | (Woe betide thee, Nag!)’; p. 175 ‘”RIKKI-TIKKI-TAVI'”; p. 212 ‘DARZEE’S CHAUNT’ [under running title ‘”RIKKI-TIKKI-TAVI”‘]; p. [214] blank; p. [215] half-title ‘TOOMAI OF THE ELEPHANTS’; p. [216] epigraph, ‘I will remember what I was, I am sick of rope and chain — | I will remember my old strength and all my forest affairs. | I will not sell my back to man for a bundle of sugar-cane, | I will go out to my own kind, and the wood-folk in their lairs. | I will go out until the day, until the morning break, | Out to the winds’ untainted kiss, the waters’ clean caress: | I will forget my ankle-ring and snap my picket-stake. | I will revisit my lost loves, and playmates masterless!’; p. 217 ‘TOOMAI OF THE ELEMENTS’; p. 261 ‘SHIV AND THE GRASSHOPPER’ [under running-title ‘TOOMAI AND THE ELEPHANTS’; p. [263] half-title ‘HER MAJESTY’S SERVANTS’; p. [264] ‘You can work it out by Fractions or by simple Rule of Three, | But the way of Tweedle-dum is not the way of Tweedle-dee. | You can twist it, you can turn it, you can plait it till you drop, | But the way of Pilly-Winky’s not the way of Winkie-Pop!’; p. 265 ‘HER MAJESTY’S SERVANTS’; p. 300 ‘PARADE-SONG OF THE CAMP ANIMALS’ [under running-title ‘HER MAJESTY’S SERVANTS’]; p. [304] blank.

Paper:

Wove paper, gilded on top edge, with an artificially beveled foredge. 7 1/4 x 4 3/4″.

Typography:

27 lines + headline 140 X 90 mm + headline and direction-line. (81r). Roman, Modern.

Illustrations:

p. [vi] 5 x 3 1/2″ illustration, full page, subtitled, “‘LITTLE TOOMAI LAID HIMSELF DOWN CLOSE TO THE GREAT NECK, | LEST A SWINGING BOUGH SHOULD SWEEP HIM TO THE GROUND.”‘ (SEE PAGE 246.); p. 1 1 x 3 1/4″ illustration, top of page; p. [5] 5 1/2 x 3 1/2″ illustration, full page, subtitled ‘”GOOD LUCK GO WITH YOU, O CHIEF OF THE WOLVES'”; p. [11] 5 1/2 x 3 1/4″ illustration, full page, subtitled ‘”THE TIGER’S ROAR FILLED THE CAVE WITH THUNDER'”; p. [17] 5 1/4 x 3 1/4″ illustration, full page, subtitled ‘THE MEETING AT THE COUNCIL ROCK.’; p. [23] 5 1/4 x 3 1/4″ illustration, full page, subtitled ‘”BAGHEERA WOULD LIE OUT ON A BRANCH AND CALL, | ‘COME ALONG, LITTLE BROTHER.'”‘; p. 47 1 3/4 x 3 1/4″ illustration, top of page; p. 93 2 x 1 3/4″ illustration, top of page; p. [99] 5 x 3 1/2″ illustration, full page, subtitled ‘”‘WAKE, LITTLE BROTHER; I BRING NEWS'”‘; p. [105] 5 1/2 x 3 1/2″ illustration, full page, subtitled ‘”‘ARE ALL THESE TALES SUCH COBWEBS AND MOONTALK?’ SAID MOWGLI”‘; p. 110 3 x 2 1/4″ illustration, center of page separating text; p. [121] 5 1/2 x 3 1/4″ illustration, full page, subtitled ‘”BULDEO LAY AS STILL AS STILL, EXPECTING EVERY MINUTE TO SEE MOWGLI TURN INTO A TIGER, TOO.”‘; p. 126 2 1/4 x 3 1/2″ illustration, top-center of page separating text, subtitled ‘”WHEN THE MOON ROSE OVER THE PLAIN THE VILLAGERS SAW MOWGLI TROTTING ACROSS, WITH TWO WOLVES AT HIS HEELS.”‘; p. [129] 4 1/2 x 3 1/2″ illustration, full page, subtitled ‘”THEY CLAMBERED UP ON THE COUNCIL ROCK TOGETHER, AND MOWGLI SPREAD THE SKIN OUT ON THE FLAT STONE.”‘; p. 137 1 1/2 x 3 1/2″ illustration, top of page; p. 146 5 1/4 x 1 1/2″ illustration, left of page, subtitled ‘”TEN FATHOMS DEEP.”‘; p. 154 2 1/2 x 3 1/4″ illustration, center of page separating text, subtitled ‘”THEY WERE ALL AWAKE AND STARING IN EVERY DIRECTION BUT THE RIGHT ONE.”‘; p. 162 2 1/4 x 3 1/4″ illustration, center of page separating text, subtitled ‘”HE HAD FOUND SE COW AT LAST.”‘; p. 175 3/4 x 3 1/4″ illustration, top of page; p. 177 3 x 2″ illustration, right of page surrounded by text, subtitled ‘”RIKKI-TIKKI LOOKED DOWN BETWEEN THE BOY’S COLLAR AND NECK.”‘; p. 178 2 1/2 x 2 1/2″ illustration, center of page separating text, subtitled ‘”HE PUT HIS NOSE INTO THE INK.”‘; p. 179 1 3/4 x 2 1/2″ illustration, center of page separating text, subtitled ‘”RIKKI-TIKKI WAS AWAKE ON THE PILLOW.”‘; p. 180 3 x 1 3/4″ illustration, left center of page surrounded by text, subtitled ‘”HE CAME TO BREAKFAST | RIDING ON TEDDY’S SHOULDER.”‘; p. 181 3 x 3 1/2″ illustration, center of page separating text, subtitled ‘”‘WE ARE VERY MISERABLE,’ SAID DARZEE”‘; p. [183] 5 1/2 x 3 1/4″ framed illustration, full page, subtitled ‘”‘I AM NAG,’ SAID THE COBRA: ‘LOOK, AND BE AFRAID!’ BUT AT TH BOTTOM | OF HIS COLD HEART HE WAS AFRAID.”‘; p. [186] 5 1/2 x 3 1/4″ illustration, full page, subtitled ‘”HE JUMPED UP IN THE AIR, AND JUST UNDER HIM WHIZZED BY THE HEAD OF NAGAINA.”‘; p. 192 2 1/2 x 3 1/4″ illustration, center of page separating text, subtitled ‘”IN THE DARK HE RAN UP AGAINST CHUCHUNDRA, THE MUSKRAT”‘; p. 197 2 3/4 x 3 1/2″ illustration, center of page separating text, subtitled ‘”THEN RIKKI-TIKKI WAS BATTERED TO AND FRO AS A RAT | IS SHAKEN BY A DOG.”‘; p. [201] 5 1/2 x 3 1/2″ framed illustration, full page, subtitled ‘DARZEE’S WIFE PRETENDS TO HAVE A BROKEN WING.’; p. 207 slanted illustration going up and to the right, 5″ going from bottom left to upper-right corner, 2 3/4″ tall at left, 2″ tall at right, 3″ wide, center of page separated by text, subtitled ‘”NAGAINA FLEW | DOWN THE PATH, | WITH RIKKI-TIKKI | BEHIND HER.”‘; p. 210 3 x 3 1/4″ illustration, center of page separating text, subtitled ‘”IT IS ALL OVER.”‘; p. 217 1 1/4 x 3 1/4″ illustration, top of page; p. [219] 5 x 3 1/4″ illustration, full page, subtitled ‘”KALA WAS THE BEST-LOVED ELEPHANT IN THE SERVICE.”‘; p. [223] 4 1/2 x 3 1/2″ illustration, full page, subtitled ‘”‘HE IS AFRAID OF ME,’ SAID LITTLE TOOMAI, AND HE MADE KALA NAG LIFT UP | HIS FEET ONE AFTER THE OTHER.”‘; p. [229] 5 1/2 x 3 1/4″ illustration, full page, subtitled ‘”HE WOULD GET HIS TORCH AND WAVE IT, AND YELL WITH THE BEST.”‘; p. [235] 5 x 3 1/2″ illustration, full page, subtitled ‘”‘NOT GREEN CORN, PROTECTOR OF THE POOR,—MELONS,’ | SAID LITTLE TOOMAI.”‘; p. [251] 5 x 3 1/2″ illustration, full page, subtitled ‘”LITTLE TOOMAI LOOKED DOWN UPON SCORES AND SCORES | OF BROAD BACKS.”‘; p. [259] 5 1/2 x 3 1/2″ illustration, full page, subtitled ‘”‘TO TOOMAI OF THE ELEPHANTS, BARRAO!'”‘; p. 263 1 1/4 x 3 1/4″ illustration, top of page; p. [267] 5 1/4 x 3 1/2″ illustration, full page, subtitled ‘”A CAMEL HAD BLUNDERED INTO MY TENT.”‘; p. [275] 5 1/4 x 3 1/2″ illustration, full page, subtitled ‘”‘ANYBODY CAN BE FORGIVEN FOR BEING SCARED IN THE NIGHT,’ SAID THE TROOP-HORSE.”‘; p. [279] 4 1/2 x 3 1/2″ illustration, full page, subtitled ‘”‘THE MAN WAS LYING ON THE GROUND, AND I STRETCHED | MYSELF NOT TO TREAD ON HIM, AND HE SLASHED UP AT ME.'”; p. [297] 4 1/2 x 3 3/4″ illustration, full page, subtitled ‘”THEN I HEARD AN OLD, GRIZZLED, LONG-HAIRED, CENTRAL ASIAN | CHIEF ASKING QUESTIONS OF A NATIVE OFFICER.”‘

Binding:

Olive green cloth with a tight cross-stich pattern on front and back. Spine has a floral pattern surrounding the text and ornaments. Text and ornaments are impressed on binding in gold paint.

Front board (7 1/2 x 5 1/4″): “THE JUNGLE BOOK” | [Elephant embossed in gold in rectangular decorative frame and “RUDYARD KIPLING” on bottom.

Back board (7 1/2 x 5 1/4″) [Tiger in decorative rectangular frame]

Spine (7 1/2 x 1 1/4″): [Ornament: Lion] | THE | JUNGLE | BOOK | [Ornament: Gazelle] | RUDYARD KIPLING | [Ornament: Tiger] | THE | CENTURY | CO. | [Ornament: Peacock]

Copy Examined: Florida State University, Strozier Library Shaw Special Collections, PR

4854 J6 1894

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